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What To Plant After Potatoes

Should you switch to a different crop after growing potatoes? The answer is a resounding yes, but knowing exactly what to plant after potatoes can be difficult — so we’ve taken it upon ourselves to identify the best options for you.

Determining what to grow after potatoes is easy if you know about potato crop rotation. Simply put, it’s a process wherein you choose light or even medium feeders. Choosing these plants will improve soil fertility since potatoes are heavy feeders.

Check them out below:

1) Peas

Pea Flower Plant

You might be wondering, “what can I plant after potatoes?” For one, peas will quickly help the soil replenish its nitrogen level as they mostly feed on phosphorus and potassium. But don’t forget to apply compost or manure to your garden soil.

This legume is best grown in well-mulched soil during autumn. Plant them at a depth of one inch but go a bit deeper if the soil isn’t as moist as expected. Likewise, a distance of two inches between each seed should help the peas grow to their full size eventually.

2) Parsnips

This vegetable thrives in both full and partial sunlight. What makes them ideal for planting after potatoes is that they also grow best in sandy soil. And don’t let its classification fool you — this biennial crop is planted as an annual as well.

Parsnips reach maturity in more or less four months, with the seedlings appearing in as early as two weeks after sowing the fresh seeds.

Check out this video to learn more about growing parsnips:

3) Dill

Dill

This herb thrives in full sunlight and loamy soil. And apart from being a light feeder, dill sows its own seeds each year if you take proper care of it. Plant them at a depth of 0.25 inches and ensure that every seed is at least 18 inches away from each other.

Furthermore, keep sowing dill seeds every two weeks or so to increase your harvest throughout the season. Note that while it’s okay to grow them near cabbage and onions, it is not advisable to grow dill with carrots around it.

4) Carrot

growing carrots

Speaking of carrots, they are also good options for planting after potatoes. Carrots grow the best in cool temperature so wait until early spring or just before winter approaches. Just like parsnips, these root vegetables thrive in sandy and even loamy soil.

Grow the carrots in rows, with the seeds at least an inch apart and planted at a depth of half an inch. Every person will have enough carrots to harvest and eat if they each have a row between five to 10 feet in length.

5) Onion

Onion

Perhaps the best thing about onion is that it grows in pretty much any soil type. As long as it receives full sunlight, this vegetable will thrive. Grow them in early spring and wait until fall to harvest, but be wary of the late spring frost by checking weather updates.

6) Edamame

Edmame

Lastly, how about some soybeans? Otherwise known as edamame if you harvest them young, this vegetable is best-suited for well-drained, loamy soil and full sunlight. Sow the seeds up to two inches deep and keep them up to four inches apart.

Edamame is what people use to not only make delicious tofu but also soy milk, which is good for people with lactose intolerance. Plus, this plant attracts butterflies to your garden — who doesn’t want that?

Overall, there are many crops to choose from after you’ve grown your potato plants. You can also grow clover, vetch, and leeks. But what matters is that you choose plants that improve soil health.

We hope our list will help improve both your garden and harvest. Feel free to send us a comment if you have any questions or suggestions.

Should you switch to a different crop after growing potatoes? The answer is a resounding yes, but knowing exactly what to plant after potatoes can be difficult — so we’ve taken it upon ourselves to identify the best options for you. #agreenhand

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